Solid white outer lines

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Snupple
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Re: Solid white outer lines

#21 Post by Snupple » 18 May 2018 11:44

Here in Australia white lines on the side are used instead of a kerb, so you know where the edge of the road is, usually beyond urban areas (aka the Outback)

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supersobes
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Re: Solid white outer lines

#22 Post by supersobes » 19 May 2018 14:26

I'm not 100% certain, but what I noticed here on the East coast of the USA, there are no shoulder lines on narrow back roads or two lane roads with a speed limit below 40 MPH.
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Axel Slingerland
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Re: Solid white outer lines

#23 Post by Axel Slingerland » 28 May 2018 21:22

I of course have no idea about Australia, but in the US, the absense of painted lines in rural areas is more of a budget issue than anything else. It costs a lot of money to paint stripes, and county Boards of Supervisors (county level law and budget makers) usually decide it's a low priority expense on mostly unused roads if their county budget is tight on money. Which they always claim that is the case, even when it isn't.
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GT182
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Re: Solid white outer lines

#24 Post by GT182 » 31 May 2018 17:20

On roads that do have them I was told years ago that they were added so people would know where the edge of the roadway way is in the rain and fog at night. And they are reflective to show better at night. Actually all the lines, yellow and white, are reflective for that same reason. And now days there are also orange/yellow reflectors added to the center of certain roadways. Usually they're even on the secondary roads too. And rumble strips along the major roadways were added so if you creep over too far they wake your butt up before you go off the road.
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Re: Solid white outer lines

#25 Post by reghasDRndb2015 » 05 Jun 2018 12:07

It is wonderful I also liked

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Re: Solid white outer lines

#26 Post by wahidovic » 06 Sep 2018 22:01

in the UK, they are normal ~225mm from the edge of the road with the line having a width of 150mm

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Re: Solid white outer lines

#27 Post by supersobes » 09 Sep 2018 03:08

@wahidovic
jal wrote:
05 Jan 2016 15:06
edit: Its about US roads.
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rikki
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Re: Solid white outer lines

#28 Post by rikki » 27 Jan 2019 05:39

in any case, first you need to learn the rules of the road

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Re: Solid white outer lines

#29 Post by GT182 » 17 May 2019 02:08

If you notice, on many of the highways the white line on the right side is reflective. They were done that way to show where the outside of the travel lane is. And also to be more visible at night, and when it's raining and with fog, to help keep you in the travel lane and not run off the highway. I remember when the was no white line and it was hell trying to stay on the roadways with out it... especially when it was foggy and/or raining at night. Tho there are still secondary roads out in the country side that do not have the white line.
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derLPMaxe
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Re: Solid white outer lines

#30 Post by derLPMaxe » 10 Oct 2019 09:39

G'day everyone.

I'm a bit into traffic planning and may further deepen the explanation on the situation on edge lines since their utilisation across Europe vary widely compared to the US.

In the UK for instance the regulation on edge lines is quite dedicated and they are not only used to demarcate the edge of the road but also to indicate parking prohibitions (the single- and double-yellow ones) without the use of a special on-road-markings (zig-zag markings are fairly common around Europe). Red lines fulfil the same purpose but also include waiting prohibitions. I've seen other parking-related colour-coded markings in other countries like Spain but am not sure about their purpose.
In other parts of Europe, edge markings can be used for indicating the safety distance between cars (e. g. in France), which in all honesty barely anyone abides by - I obviously do! Other countries utilise marker posts for that.
It is to be noted that edge markings are in general more common outside of settlements and on curbless roads than elsewhere as most streets are either ideally well-lit enough or have curbs to demarcate the edge of the outer and inner lanes.
Regarding centre markings: They come in different colours, often depending on how much snow is expected on the road in the specific country, and slightly different shapes but all-in-all fulfil the same purpose.
Some countries have a special category of markings: Temporary markings. Germany and I reckon Switzerland has those. They are yellow or orange and overwrite the permanent markings to give traffic guidance around construction sites and whenever traffic guidance is temporarily changed for a longer period of time. They function the same as their permanent counterparts.

If there are any further question I would love to research and answer them.

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