Ireland pre-research tips

Janaff
Posts: 22
Joined: 06 Jan 2020 23:02

Re: Ireland pre-research tips

#21 Post by Janaff » 07 Feb 2020 01:43

Irish Emergency Services
Notes on the emergency services of Northern Ireland I've compiled in these two posts in the UK research thread.

Police (Garda Síochána)
Omicron has already given a recommendation here:
Omicron13 wrote:
02 Jan 2020 21:55
I'd personally say a Hyundai is probably the most representative pick, as Hyundai is unusually popular in Ireland. Here's an image of what the rear of a traffic corps patrol car looks like.

Ambulance
Ambulances primarily use the Mercedes-Benz Sprinter chassis. (Front, Rear)

In Dublin, ambulance services are partially operated by the Dublin Fire Brigade. Their ambulances have a different livery to match. (Front, Side, Rear, Irish language livery).

Fire
This website provides examples of fire engines.


I'm not too confident about giving examples of police/paramedic/firefighter uniforms.

Ethan QS
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Joined: 09 Oct 2018 12:15
Location: Naas, Republic of Ireland
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Re: Ireland pre-research tips

#22 Post by Ethan QS » 09 Feb 2020 01:11

Just to add to what the previous posts have said about Irish police (Garda) cars;

Most common by far would be the Hyundai i40 as previously mentioned.

However, Garda cars are updated every 3 years I believe, and the recent most common vehicle is the Hyundai Tucson https://images.app.goo.gl/ZZwJ23rmcMe6y4W1A. This is slowly replacing the outgoing i40 patrol cars.

Secondarily, there’s the Hyundai i30 (very common, though less so than the i40), the Ford Mondeo, Ford Focus (estate only), Opel Insignia (estate only), the Ford Ranger, the Ford Transit Van (an important one but not a general patrol vehicle) and the Mitsubishi Pajero.

The gardaí have an armed response unit which can often be seen in the Audi Q7, BMW 5 series, and BMW x5. Most common one i’ve seen is the Q7.

As far as unmarked cars, unlikely to matter in this context, the Hyundai i40/i30 and Ford Mondeo are the only suspects regularly seen.

My picks for the ones that should be used would be the Hyundai i40, Hyundai Tucson, and maybe the armed response Q7 as a little extra. The Ford Transit would also make a good prop for the random events.

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Omicron13
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Location: Co. Tipperary, Ireland

Re: Ireland pre-research tips

#23 Post by Omicron13 » 17 Feb 2020 15:25

Road signs (detailed)
Font: Transport Heavy for both Irish and English. English text is in capital letters, while Irish is in lowercase italic letters. Special characters are used for capital and lowercase a, n and m. A dotless i can be seen on older signs.
Colour: Blue for motorway signs with white text (including services located ON the motorway), green for national roads with white text and white for local and regional roads with black text. Brown signs with white text indicate "tourist and leisure destinations", services located OFF motorways, river names and county boundaries.
Route numbers: See Other points > Route numbers: viewtopic.php?f=249&t=267669&start=10 (very very minor and unusual detail)
Warning signs: Are diamond-shaped, black on a yellow/amber background.
Regulatory signs: Are divided into restrictive (circular, black on a white background with a red border), prohibitory (same as restrictive, with a diagonal red line) and mandatory (circular, white on a blue background). The STOP and YIELD signs, as well as bus lane signs, also come under regulatory signs.

Several signs' design are very inconsistent, such as the No left turn/No right turn signs, Pedestrian crossing (e.g. 1 and 2), No overtaking (where the shape of the cars vary e.g. 1 and 2) and speed limits (which should only look like these).

Traffic signs manual: A list of PDFs can be found on the Irish government website. Each PDF goes into a lot of detail regarding the specified traffic signs, as well as road markings and location of traffic signs.

This Wikipedia article on Irish road signs also goes into detail (though not nearly as much). The Italian language article opted for a different layout, and shows a few more signs not displayed on the English language article. It also gives some details for each sign.

As well as varying pedestrian crossing signs, Belisha beacons (yellow flashing lights located next to them) also vary. It would be a nice detail to add these to pedestrian crossings.
Last edited by Omicron13 on 23 Jul 2020 20:18, edited 2 times in total.
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Janaff
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Re: Ireland pre-research tips

#24 Post by Janaff » 18 Mar 2020 04:11

Notes on Irish railways
Ireland uses a unique wide gauge, 5ft 3in, colloquially known as "Irish Gauge". Most of Europe uses Standard Gauge, 4ft 8½in, for comparison.

There are two rail companies in Ireland. Iarnród Éireann (Irish Rail) operates in the Republic of Ireland, while NI Railways operates in Northern Ireland. Both companies jointly operate the Enterprise, a train which runs between Belfast and Dublin. Around the border, the Belfast-Dublin line follows the M1/N1/A1 road relatively closely, and the Enterprise should be visible on this line.
In the Republic:
M1 crossing, north of Dundalk
In Northern Ireland:
A1 crossing
Newry's southern A1 junction
Newry's "Egyptian Arch"

Other noteworthy places:
On Wexford's waterfront, the rail line runs along it on a single track with barely any separation from the road.
In Cork, the railway runs parallel to the N8 for much of that road's eastern approach, including separating that road and Cork's container port.

Also of note is Dublin's DART system, a commuter railway that functions as a metro-style service. Except for maybe here, there isn't really a spot where it runs close to major roads or industrial areas unfortunately.

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Omicron13
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Location: Co. Tipperary, Ireland

Re: Ireland pre-research tips

#25 Post by Omicron13 » 31 Mar 2020 14:52

Just a little update on roads:
M11 (Gorey-Enniscorthy Bypass) - there is now Street View available on Google Maps; R772 via Enniscorthy is no longer necessary to include.
N25 (New Ross Bypass) - there is now Street View available on Google Maps (although not the best quality); former N25 via New Ross now redesignated as R723, which (as well as New Ross) is no longer necessary to include.
Image

IrishStee
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Joined: 30 Apr 2020 18:29

Re: Ireland pre-research tips

#26 Post by IrishStee » 01 May 2020 10:39

Omicron13 wrote:
02 Jan 2020 21:55
REPUBLIC OF IRELAND
Cities:
Dublin, Cork, Galway, Limerick, Waterford

(Suggested) Towns:
Athlone, Sligo, Kilkenny, Castlebar, Mullingar, Tralee, Clonmel, Arklow, Port Laoise, Wexford (if it will fit), Letterkenny (if it will fit), Killarney (scenic town, if N22 is added), Dungarvan (scenic town, if N25 is added) / Youghal (scenic town, if N25 is added), [New Ross (scenic town, if [N25] R723 is added)], [Enniscorthy (scenic town, if R772 is added)]

Ports/harbours
Dublin Port (to Holyhead), Rosslare (to Fishguard/Pembroke & Roscoff/Cherbourg)

Motorways & National Roads
Obviously not all of these will fit, these are just the roads that lead to the places I've listed above.
M50 - Dublin ring road; include Dublin Port Tunnel & M50 Tolls (between J6 & J7 and Dublin Port Tunnel)
M1 - Dublin towards Northern Ireland
M4 - Dublin to around Kinnegad; N4 - Coralstown towards Sligo & entering Dublin
M6 - Kinnegad towards Galway; N6 around Athlone & entering Galway
M7 - Dublin towards Limerick; N7 entering Dublin after Naas; include MidLink M7/M8 toll in Co. Laois
M8 - Dublin to Cork (via M7) (N8 entering Cork)
M9 - Dublin to Waterford (via M7); N9 near Waterford)
N10 - road from M9 to Kilkenny
M11 - Dublin to Wexford (N11 along some parts, including around Wexford)
N13 & N15 - Sligo towards Northern Ireland via Letterkenny
N16 - Sligo towards Northern Ireland (to Enniskillen)
M17 - Rathmorrissy Interchange to Tuam; N17 after Tuam towards Sligo
M18 - Limerick to Rathmorrissy Interchange; N18 around Limerick
N20 - Limerick to Cork not sure if this could fit; M20 near Limerick
N21 - M20 towards Tralee
N22 - Cork towards Tralee
N23 - Joins N21 & N22
N24 - Limerick towards Waterford via Clonmel
N25 - Cork towards Rosslare Harbour
N27 - N8 in Cork towards Cork Airport Business Park (but only needs to go as far as the N40)
[N30 - Enniscorthy towards New Ross]
N40 - forms southern part of Cork ring road
N60 - N17 towards Castlebar (could also add N5 as well or instead)
(N84 - Galway towards Castlebar)

[R723 - formerly N25, from Glenmore Roundabout through New Ross to Ballymacar Roundabout.] No need for this road, Google Maps has Street View for the new section of the N25.
[R772 - formerly N11, from the roundabout where the M11 joins the current N11 (towards Wexford) through Enniscorthy to Clogh Roundabout.] No need for this road, Google Maps has Street View for the new section of the M11.
Image

Roads under construction/recently completed construction
M7 around Naas is being widened to 6 lanes (3+3) - http://www.m7upgrade.com/
N25 New Ross bypass (including Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Bridge) - https://www.n25newross.ie/
M11 Gorey-Enniscorthy bypass - opened in July last year - https://www.m11gtoe.ie/

Other points
  • Ireland is divided into 4 provinces (Munster, Leinster, Connacht & Ulster), which are further divided into counties (26 in ROI, 6 in NI). It would be nice to see these signs in-game. Examples: 1 & 2.
  • Irish language is displayed on road signs (please don't ignore like the Welsh ones...)
  • National roads (N1-N49) usually have hard shoulders, N50 onwards usually don't.
  • Speed limits:
    • Residential areas: 30km/h
    • Built-up areas: 50km/h
    • Local (L) & regional (R) roads: 80km/h
    • National (N) roads: 100km/h (80km/h for vehicles over 3.5 tonnes)
    • Motorways (M): 120km/h (90km/h for vehicles over 3.5 tonnes) (with the exception of the M50 - 100km/h)
    (more info)
  • In addition to these speed limits, please do not use this sign as either an indication of "end of restrictions" or "end of previous speed limit" - it simply doesn't exist in Ireland (a similar one is used but only for local roads). In its place should be a sign indicating the new speed limit.
  • Road sign font is Transport Heavy on ALL signs, with additional characters for letters ('a', 'm', 'n' & formerly 'i') used in the italic Irish text (e.g. https://imgur.com/QtYZbs3).
  • The majority of service stations are located off motorways - some notable ones include Barack Obama Plaza & Junction 14 Mayfield off the M7 & the Manor Stone Service Station off the M8.
  • There are very little (if any) speed cameras in Ireland. Instead, there are usually "speed vans" (e.g. Ford Transit Custom & Fiat Ducato) located at the sides of roads (usually national - I've never seen any on motorways). On motorways, Garda cars are (very rarely) located in bays (marked with "Garda Only" signs [example]).
  • Licence plates - see this Wikipedia article (notably "Format and specifications"). There is no specific font used (any sans serif font can be used). Charles Wright (like the UK or a lighter version) is quite common. Examples: 1, 2, 3, 4.
Amazing spot on information there. I'd just like to add a few bits of scenic information for the North West.

Donegal:
  • In Letterkenny there is a massive hill as you enter the town that has a side runaway for Trucks, we've seen Runways being used in American Truck Simulator, however in Ireland I believe we call them Escape Lanes.
    You could also add a route from Letterykenny to Derry(Londonderry) which is located in Northern Ireland and you could then connect them to Belfast which also has a Port that connects to Liverpool and Cairnryan in Scotland.
    If SCS were to add a Sligo-Letterkenny route, there is a beautiful area about midway that passes Barnsmore Gap. A road that passes between two mountains.
    Image
Sligo
  • Sligo is the second largest town on the west of Ireland after Galway, it has a port which is used quite often to this day with ships coming from Norway, Wales and Scotland, sadly no passenger ships, however it would be ideal for an in-game shipping company to collect or deliver Coal, Sawdust, Scrap Metal which would mimic the ports real life use.
    Sligo has many mountains but none two are as famous as Benbulben and Knocknarea.
    Benbulben: Image
    Knocknarea: Image
    Sligo is well known by well known poet W.B. Yeats who is buried just outside the town on the N15 that connects Sligo - Donegal.
Mayo
  • I don't have much information on Mayo, but I had to share one of its most famous mountains that on a clear day can be seen from the N17 Sligo-Galway road.
    Croagh Patrick
    Image
Wild Atlantic Way
  • The west of Ireland is also well known for the Wild Atlantic Way, a lovely scenic route down the west of Ireland, it may not be possible to add the full route, but you could however add parts here and there.
    Image

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Omicron13
Posts: 34
Joined: 26 May 2018 08:27
Location: Co. Tipperary, Ireland

Re: Ireland pre-research tips

#27 Post by Omicron13 » 13 May 2020 11:29

Tolls
There are 11 tolls located across Ireland, as can be seen below.
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All tolls use barrier operated toll plazas, with the exception of the M50 barrier-free toll (which is paid automatically, provided you have an account, or online before 8pm the following day).
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"Express lanes" can be found at all other toll plazas, where cars, jeeps and small vans only with an "eToll" tag can pass through the toll hassle-free.
The Dublin Port Tunnel toll is free for HGVs (which Yardem & HRTrucker have mentioned) and buses/coaches, which must keep left when approaching the plaza.

More info (including prices) found here and here.
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