Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

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GT182
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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#81 Post by GT182 » 14 Sep 2020 01:28

Choosing computer parts is a headache unto itself..... and always has been. To make it worse, parts change, and not always for the better and way too often. Just when you think you have the best you can afford out comes something newer within 2 months of your build or upgrade. But IMO it's still better than buying a desktop from any store with all the crap that's installed in them. And mainly they make you think they are top-end computers, But they aren't even close unless you get into the "big buck" computers that are still loaded with crap.
Gary - CB code name: CW
I've hauled ass down the road to deliver new cars and trucks, fuel, freight, and produce. Now I'm ATS addicted to doing the same thing in a simulation. :roll:

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Reignman
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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#82 Post by Reignman » 14 Sep 2020 04:33

Some newbie driver wrote:
12 Sep 2020 22:03
You have to understand how CPUs are manufactured. Intel or AMD (and specially AMD due it's highly modular architecture) doesn't manufacture lots of specific CPU models. They manufacture a basic design that it's common for LOTS of CPU models on the same generation and then, once tested it's performance, the final performance will be enforced depending on the test results and thus the chip will be labeled.
Dang, it's like you just explained to me how hot dogs were made, except with CPU's? Thanks a lot, now you ruined CPU's for me lol. Now I won't settle for anything less than a R9 3950x, which means I have to pair it with a 1050ti and only 8GB of 2666 RAM because it'll be all I can afford xD.
Some newbie driver wrote:
12 Sep 2020 22:03
Those engines that are stable at medium power ratios will have 6 pistons disabled and will be labeled as 480HP for example. Engines with defects could not withstand normal operation, will have pistons disabled and turbo pressure reduced and labeled as 350HP only. And engines that had ben outstandingly build could sustain more power and then will be 8 pistons actives and labeled 730HP.
Alright, I understood the CPU analogy better than this engine stuff lol. J/k, I know what you meant with both.
Some newbie driver wrote:
12 Sep 2020 22:03
Yes, I don't like to be a laboratory rat neither. It was what happened me with my old FX and that's why I waited to replace it until Ryzen 3rd gen (I was waiting for all the details to be polished enough).
Haha exactly! I refer to them as guinea pigs. Yeah, you guys endure all those early problems, and I'll learn from them and wait for the improvements xD. Well the real reason is, new technology is usually way too expensive and older technology suddenly becomes cheaper. Live in the past and save money ;)
Some newbie driver wrote:
12 Sep 2020 22:03
You are an informed consumer and that's why you know you should no purchase a 20 series GPU now. Of all the people you could see on a computer store, how many do you think they are informed like you? You know they will be very few.
You're too kind. I don't know about informed. Maybe patient? But no I like to do my research. When I decided to build a new PC a few months ago, I didn't know much about what was currently on the market. After using the same PC for 12 years, I stopped paying attention to the technology, so now I'm trying to soak up as much info as I can and get caught up.

I hate to think what kind of machine I would have built if I just went with my initial thoughts back then lol. Even if you go back to the first page where I posted the list of initial parts I had in mind, I was set on those parts at the time. I would have built that PC had I not sought 2nd opinions. Asking for opinions from people who know better, such as yourself, was the next step though because no matter how much research you do, you're always going to overlook something, and there's always someone who knows more who can help you avoid making mistakes. You definitely know your stuff, and you keep forcing me to dig deeper. Waiting for the R5 to come back down in price has given me more time I guess. I'll most likely wait until gen 4 now.

As a result I've changed my mind on most of that original list. That list wasn't even my first list lol. I was already at this for a month or 2 before I posted about it. I gotta live with this machine for the next 5-10 years, so I want to exhaust every avenue possible. I'm reading reviews and watching videos everyday about something. Just watched a video about VRAM, chokes, mosfet, capacitors etc lol. More than I need to know, but it's still interesting.

Earlier I mentioned the GPU I wanted didn't have a backplate, which only then made me wonder what a backplate was even for lol. So I read a little more about them, and watched some videos. I thought they helped dissipate heat, like a heatsink, but it turns out most of them are for aesthetics. Which makes sense because I saw a few that had a plastic backplate which made me avoid them. And they can trap heat if they don't have thermal pads. They do look better with the backplate though. Some claim it helps prevent sag, but that doesn't make sense because the backplate isn't directly connected to the PCI slot. If anything the extra weight would contribute to sag, but the cards I'm looking at are small enough where sag isn't really an issue anyway.

I'll have to reconsider that card because it was the only one short enough to not entirely block the chipset fan on that X570 I want lol. Although that doesn't help me 5 years from now when I'll be looking for a 2080 or 3070. A B550 almost seems like the better choice for that alone. Even the X570's that have the chipset fan in a more logical location rub me the wrong way. It's just one more thing that could fail at some point. A plain old heatsink, like on the B550's won't fail, so one less thing to worry about. On the other hand, the more I learn about PCIe 4.0, the more I realize the B550's aren't as future proof as the X570's. I just can't find a better X570 than the ASUS, at that price point. The VRAM sucks on most of the others, or they lack features. I just don't understand that chipset fan on the ASUS lol. What were you thinking ASUS? Is that why that board is so affordable? They realized it has that flaw?

Some newbie driver
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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#83 Post by Some newbie driver » 14 Sep 2020 07:01

That's what I mean with informed. Not that you are continuously knowing the computer trends and all the buzz but you take the time to know details before to purchase anything. While vast majority of people in a computer's store just go there the same day they decide they need to buy something, zero checks before, zero share of opinions with other people.And then go to BB or Walmart or similar stores and end purchasing whatever a bad-trained commercial would throw to their eyes.

And about the motherboard, as I said TUF series are aimed for long-term endurance; so I expect it to be good and they usually have a long term warranty backed up directly from ASUS. The reasons of the price I can't explain them, tons of things were no one of us have insight; but I'm sure it's not because the fan design. You are too worried about it's occlusion. In general, lot of people is too worried about vent occlusion inside a computer case and then it came all that trend to put out any "restriction" to the airflow... when in reality there's nothing that will prevent it unless you really fill the case with solid blocking stuff (look for a video of Linus Tech tips they did time ago about that, you will see what I mean). Ironically, the occlusion that should worry people is from outside to inside the case and where to put the fans.... And then lot of people fails miserably in that point just because they are more worried about the aesthetics than about the airflow (your chosen case is good for that, we already discussed this).

Believe me, no graphic card is going to affect the ventilation of that chipset. Worse problem for lots of cases are going to be the new NVidia card with its own cooler design, with that vent throwing half the heat of the card directly up to the RAM and CPU heat sink (if not water cooled). Once the embargo is lifted, you can be sure that GN will do an extensive analysis of that point.

Regards

EDIT: The lower price of the TUF comes maybe that ASUS don't put on those series some of the extra details that put on the ROG series, like better audio chip, Intel network chip maybe at higher 2,5Gb/s, integrated IO shield or the lack of this board of USB 3.0 gen 2 for the front panel. Small details here and there that make the board a bit cheaper than the more "gaming oriented"; even if more of them are mostly... useless and just gimmicks to chase people attention and make them pay more. You can perfectly live without any of them.

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Reignman
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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#84 Post by Reignman » 14 Sep 2020 21:47

GT182 wrote:
13 Sep 2020 04:09
Reignman, I like this Mci Tomahawk B550 motherboard once I got it figured out with Micro Center's tech help. And I love the Corsair dual fan H80i v2 liquid cooling for the CPU.
That looks like a nice board. I love the rear I/O, but it's a bit out of my price range at $180. It's close though, so I might have to consider it anyway. That 2nd M.2 slot is only PCIe 3.0, so that's a bummer. Or it was a bummer. I just watched a video of someone comparing load speeds between SSD's on SATA, PCIe 3.0, and PCIe 4.0, and the difference between 3.0 and 4.0 is only a fraction of a second with most games, programs, and OS, or well within the margin of error. Heck the SATA wasn't even far behind. I think I get too caught up in the numbers sometimes. Something seems better than it actually is because it has a better number. I mean it's better, but if we're talking seconds, then it's virtually the same, and it would be better to go with the cheaper option. I blame my OCD.
Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 07:01
And about the motherboard, as I said TUF series are aimed for long-term endurance; so I expect it to be good and they usually have a long term warranty backed up directly from ASUS. The reasons of the price I can't explain them, tons of things were no one of us have insight; but I'm sure it's not because the fan design. You are too worried about it's occlusion.
Alright, you've convinced me to stick with the TUF lol, which is good because that's the one I've had my heart set on. I spent quite a bit of time looking at other X570's and B550 last night and none of them really scratched the itch quite like the TUF unless I want to spend $200, which I don't. I do like the Tomahawk @GT182 mentioned above, but it's a little out of my price range, and it's not an X570.

As far as the chipset fan goes on the TUF, I saw some X570's where the fan is under a vented cover, or behind the heatsink (hard to tell), so that leads me to believe maybe airflow isn't as important as I think (like you just confirmed), so I'm feeling better about it now. Which is good because I found a long 3 fan GPU that I like, that will definitely cover it lol, plus the larger 2080 or 3070 I get in the future will cover it as well.
Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 07:01
the occlusion that should worry people is from outside to inside the case and where to put the fans.... And then lot of people fails miserably in that point just because they are more worried about the aesthetics than about the airflow (your chosen case is good for that, we already discussed this).
I did get a different case than the one I originally mentioned (Cougar MX331-mesh), but this one is slightly bigger and has great ventilation too (mesh front panel and top), with 5 fan slots (1 rear, 2 top, 2 front), and a vent in the bottom for the PSU which is under a shroud. I'll have each slot populated with a 120mm PWM fan. 2 intake in the front, 2 exhaust on top, and the exhaust in the back.

The only thing I don't like about the case is it has a plastic transparent side panel on instead of a vented panel. They had another model that had a vented side panel, but it lacked other features, so I'm going to contact them about ordering the vented side panel separately. This case has slots for one and 2 back thumb screw slots, so that should work. Not that I need the extra ventilation or anything, but the cheap plastic panel isn't hinged (4 thumb screws), and since my build isn't going to be RGB, I think a regular side panel will look better/cleaner. Plus I would like to slap another intake fan there so it blows directly on everything and the air flow will be balanced (3 intake, 3 exhaust).

I'll probably take a break from trying to finish building this PC for a few weeks and wait for gen 4 and the rest of the 30 series to come out, then check everything again in October. That means another month of tolerating this crappy PC and not getting much done lol. But I don't think I have a choice. Part of the impatience is due to the fact that I've already ordered and received some parts. My monitor, case, HDD, and PSU. Because I found deals that I couldn't pass up. The problem is, most of them have a 30 day return policy, so that's going to expire before I get the rest of my parts. The good thing is, most of it has a 1 or more year warranty so I guess I'll just have to deal with the manufacturer if anything isn't working.

In the meantime, I'm thinking about ordering a small SATA SSD, better RAM, and a cheap GPU in an effort to upgrade my current PC a little bit while I wait. I watched JayzTwoCents do something similar with a 12yo PC (same as mine) and I liked the results. I figure I can maybe squeeze into all that for $100. On the other hand I can save the $100 and upgrade something on the new PC? Decisions, decisions. I would like to continue using this PC after I get the new one, so I'm leaning toward the upgrade.

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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#85 Post by Some newbie driver » 14 Sep 2020 22:53

Reignman wrote:
14 Sep 2020 21:47
I just watched a video of someone comparing load speeds between SSD's on SATA, PCIe 3.0, and PCIe 4.0, and the difference between 3.0 and 4.0 is only a fraction of a second with most games, programs, and OS, or well within the margin of error. Heck the SATA wasn't even far behind.
What people needs to understand is that RAW performance values on disk (any kind of disk), even the random seek tests, consider a CONTINUOUS operation over the disk. What it happens in fact is that a software calls for some data and then DO SOMETHING with that data (or do some other tasks) before require more data from storage. For example, when the SCS game loads, game engine must keep unpacking the different contents on the files it receives from disk and in the meantime the CPU could jump to other tasks.

That means the disks are working on intermittent bursts and you are never going to reach the max throughput, shortening the differences between different SSD types. That's why Intel's Octane SSD makes systems more responsive than any other kind of SSD. Even they have less throughput, their IOPs and specially the latency are way better than other SSD technologies; reducing a lot the lag on the system. Does this means that better SSD at PCIe3 or 4 are useless? NO That means they are useful only on certain scenarios that aren't the daily basis of most user's today.

So, notice first the word "today"; PCIe4 now could be an overkill but it's a future-prof. Remember new NVidia cards (and maybe AMD too, because AMD will have something similar on the new Playstation) will be able to load data directly from the storage. Actually, to load a game, data have to be sent from disk to RAM, then the CPU unpacks it, moves the result to RAM again, and then from there to the graphic card VRAM. And in the meantime, other task could take the control of the CPU and interrupt it. Soon the graphic-accelerated software will be able to instruct the graphic card: "load that data from storage, decompress it yourself and load into VRAM. And let me alone in the CPU doing other things meanwhile. That's the future. In 2 years we are going to hate any game that doesn't leverage that feature because the difference (with good M.2 storage) is going to be abysmal. Remember my words.

And actually? The differences are going to be noticed on long storage operations; specially when dealing with tons of small files. Two weeks ago I had to mount a 1.800€ workstation for a client and I decided to put on it a Corsair PCIe4 M.2 disk (it even has a nice price, then why not?). And I wanted to know how much time it took the Windows install. Do you guess how many? Until the first reboot, approx 1 minute including ALL the previous selections and EULAS and all that sh** (I could make it with closed eyes, I move fast). But the copy operation of files itself took less than 20 SECONDS from an USB-3 pendrive. No SATA disk is going to approach a kilometer from that performance. Obviously, they aren't going to reinstall Windows every-day; but go imagine how easy and fast could be an imaging backup and restore process to be sure your PC content is always safe. From hours letting the computer on and finding the result next day to a couple of minutes?
Reignman wrote:
14 Sep 2020 21:47
As far as the chipset fan goes on the TUF, I saw some X570's where the fan is under a vented cover, or behind the heatsink (hard to tell), so that leads me to believe maybe airflow isn't as important as I think
X570 chipset is rated at 11W consume. That's 1/3 of several normal laptop actual CPUs and it's obvious, inside a laptop the airflow is more constricted than just having a graphic card in front and vents aren't so much bigger. So, do your own napkin maths. As I said you, lots of times the vent is off; specially if most of your beefiest devices are linked to the CPU PCIe lanes (as it should) instead to the chipset ones.
Reignman wrote:
14 Sep 2020 21:47
and since my build isn't going to be RGB, I think a regular side panel will look better/cleaner. Plus I would like to slap another intake fan there so it blows directly on everything and the air flow will be balanced (3 intake, 3 exhaust).
Screw the RGB, yes! :lol: Anyway, don't count the fan balance that way. It's not just a sum of fans. If your case is meshed to prevent dust entry into the system, the intake fans can't work so efficiently (their air flow is noticeably blocked) while the exhaust fans doesn't have that problem (unless you exhaust through an AIO radiator, for example). So, equaling the number of fans should not be enough. Intake should be bigger (140 VS 120) or working more than the outtake ones (configured at higher RPMs, or being models with more static pressure). So, you need more than just put that fan in the lateral panel if you obtain it (for a well balanced airflow).
Reignman wrote:
14 Sep 2020 21:47
The problem is, most of them have a 30 day return policy, so that's going to expire before I get the rest of my parts.
Check them on your current computer if you are worried of any of them could being defective.
Reignman wrote:
14 Sep 2020 21:47
In the meantime, I'm thinking about ordering a small SATA SSD, better RAM, and a cheap GPU in an effort to upgrade my current PC a little bit while I wait. I watched JayzTwoCents do something similar with a 12yo PC (same as mine) and I liked the results. I figure I can maybe squeeze into all that for $100. On the other hand I can save the $100 and upgrade something on the new PC? Decisions, decisions. I would like to continue using this PC after I get the new one, so I'm leaning toward the upgrade.
Save the money for the current rig until you have it complete. If you save some money in the end, you will have it to keep the second rig in order to do secondary works. If you spend it now on the update and later you can't find the deals I expected you could find; you are going to curse me to don't be able to finish the computer before next year. :lol: And BTW, those videos of J2C, or Linus or others "bringing life" to old computers are true, but they aren't giving you the performance you want to forget you are on a 10 years old rig. Not for the works you want to do. That's worthy for office work and retro-gaming.

Regards

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Reignman
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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#86 Post by Reignman » 15 Sep 2020 20:58

Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 22:53
Actually, to load a game, data have to be sent from disk to RAM, then the CPU unpacks it, moves the result to RAM again, and then from there to the graphic card VRAM. And in the meantime, other task could take the control of the CPU and interrupt it. Soon the graphic-accelerated software will be able to instruct the graphic card: "load that data from storage, decompress it yourself and load into VRAM.
Yeah I just watched a video about this recently and I wondered how much those GPU's were going to cost haha. It's something I personally won't have for awhile. I was surprised current PC's worked that way, with everything needing to go through RAM. I thought the GPU loaded or read the game files directly from the HDD/SSD.
Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 22:53
And let me alone in the CPU doing other things meanwhile. That's the future. In 2 years we are going to hate any game that doesn't leverage that feature because the difference (with good M.2 storage) is going to be abysmal. Remember my words.
Not if you never get used to it lol. Using my current PC hasn't bothered me too much, but if someone else had to use it after using something a bit more modern, I'm sure it would drive them nuts. OMG 720p!!! How do you live like this? Easy, I don't know what 1080p is like xD. Soon I'll get to find out what I've been missing all this time.
Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 22:53
Two weeks ago I had to mount a 1.800€ workstation for a client and I decided to put on it a Corsair PCIe4 M.2 disk (it even has a nice price, then why not?).
Ahhh it all makes sense now. I figured you were into some of this on a professional level. You know too much about it xD.
Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 22:53
And I wanted to know how much time it took the Windows install. Do you guess how many? Until the first reboot, approx 1 minute including ALL the previous selections and EULAS and all that sh** (I could make it with closed eyes, I move fast). But the copy operation of files itself took less than 20 SECONDS from an USB-3 pendrive.
I only knew it was fast because I watched some videos when I researched SSD's. I think it takes me 45+ minutes to install windows 7 on my 7200 RPM HDD, and over a minute to boot. And lord knows how long to download/install all the updates after that. I'm about to install Windows 10 on my new 7200 RPM, SATA HDD, so I'll see how long it takes.
Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 22:53
If your case is meshed to prevent dust entry into the system, the intake fans can't work so efficiently (their air flow is noticeably blocked) while the exhaust fans doesn't have that problem
The fans came in a pack of 4, so they'll all be 120mm. I use Hardware Monitor so I'll monitor RPM's/temps, and research how to setup the fans properly. The MB I'm getting has temp sensors and will let me use 3 different settings for each fan based on those temps.
Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 22:53
Check them on your current computer if you are worried of any of them could being defective.
Maybe. My current GPU doesn't have a display port and I don't have an adapter, so I can't test the monitor. Although if I intend to use 3 monitors (I have 2 older DVI monitors), I'm going to need adapters anyway, so I'll probably order those soon and then I can test my monitor too. I'm going to test the 2TB SATA HDD tonight. In fact I'm creating a Windows 10 flash installation right now that I'm going to install onto it. I heard my Windows 7 key will work to activate Windows 10, so I want to test that out. And I probably won't test the PSU. That would require me to tear my entire PC apart, which I don't want to do xD.
Some newbie driver wrote:
14 Sep 2020 22:53
Save the money for the current rig until you have it complete. If you save some money in the end, you will have it to keep the second rig in order to do secondary works. If you spend it now on the update and later you can't find the deals I expected you could find; you are going to curse me to don't be able to finish the computer before next year.
Yeah you're probably right. I thought it would be a good idea to keep using this older PC for secondary work after I get the new PC finished, but now that I think about it, with 6 cores and multi display, I won't need 2 PC's. I should be able to multitask just fine with one. With the extra $100 I could get the 32GB of RAM and make that easier.

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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#87 Post by Some newbie driver » 15 Sep 2020 22:12

PSU basic works are easy to test, JUST test. Lay it at the side of your computer, unplug everything on it (letting the cables loose near where they were plugged) and just plug the new one with all the cables on the middle of everything. Awful look but it works and it's fast and you just want to test, not to let it for ages.

And about the Win 10 installation, beware! Because by your words I think you DON'T understand how the Win7 to Win10 change works. Microsoft never allowed (as far as I know) to use Windows 7 to activate Windows 10. What they alow is to UPGRADE a computer that has a legit and activated Windows 7 already on it. Doing so, the Microsoft licensing servers issue a new license for Windows 10 in behalf of the license of Windows 7 and TIED TO THAT HARDWARE.

So, if you install Windows 10 on a different hard drive on your actual computer two thinks can happen
- You have also plugged your Windows 7 older drive at the same time, install detects it, activates your Windows 10 for that OLD hardware, REMOVES your old Windows 7 installation and replaces it with a Windows 10 upgraded one (an I don't even know if it will allow you to chose or will install it in the same old drive where the Win7 was; probably). If all of this happens, you will NOT be able to activate Win10 in the new PC with the Win7 key in any means.
- You just plug the new hard drive in your old computer, unplugging the one with your older Win 7. The installation doesn't find any previous legit activated Windows so it doesn't auto-activate. Your Win10 installation will neither activate no matter how many times you try to write the key number of your Windows 7.

If you want your actual Win7 license allow you a free Win10 running in your new computer, you will have to do this:
- Do a fresh install of Windows 7 on the new computer and don't bother to install anything else but the LAN drivers
- Activate it for whatever method you can (online if it works, but probably you will have to do it by phone)
- In that last case, say something like "I had to change my motherboard due failure" (lie! lie! lieeeee!) :mrgreen:
- Once the Windows 7 is active, reboot, boot from the Win10 installation pen drive and chose the complete install erasing any previous windows
- Press the "Skip" option in any window that ask you for the license key
- Once the install starts, it will detect the win7 activated on there and issue a new activation code for your Windows 10
- Check the activation status once you enter into the Windows desktop for first time and you are sure you have Internet connection
- If it says "activated with a digital license"; you had succeed and you could now format as many things you want that PC that it will always activate unless you do a really major hardware change (mostly, motherboard change)

Regards
Reignman wrote:
15 Sep 2020 20:58
Ahhh it all makes sense now. I figured you were into some of this on a professional level. You know too much about it xD.
Yes, for too many years, it's not that I hide it or something. :P Actually it's been a long time since I was at the level of being me who mounts machines. But not all days one can tinker with such an expensive desktop machines (with lots of servers way more expensive, but they aren't so cool as workstation hardware). So I said: It was me who chose the parts in behalf of the client, that puppy is mine to mount it. It was more playing at work than really working. 8-)

PS: Don't have the slightest remorse by lying about the reasons of having to activate by phone if that's the case. You know, if they weren't interested in you dumping Win7 and installing the Windows 10 with all their telemetry to feed them with lots of personal data to make money with; the upgrade process had not been working for years now. They WANT us to run Windows 10, it's just they have to do the charade to resemble they still care for the money they make selling windows keys to consumers. The word free still scares too much stock holders. ;)

EDIT: Just for curiosity, I searched a bit more and I found some people saying that you still can write the Win7 key directly into a Win 10 fresh install in 2020 and made it work. Of course, as they hide the keys being used in their demonstrations, it's just a question of faith. I can say you that procedure gave us problems even when the free update was officially live (Microsoft allegedly stopped that working back on 2016, even it still works). You can try to save you the time of the previous Win 7 install if you wish. The procedure I explained you is working 100% because we still apply it frequently (not fresh Win 7 installs, but on not-so-old client computers to remove Win7 that could cause problems). What it's 100% sure too is that the free upgrade is for a single hardware for each single Win7 key. If you make the mistake to try it on your old computer, you will have to pay a new Windows 10 key for the new computer (another US 120$ approx to your budget, ouch!).

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Crocko From Oz
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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#88 Post by Crocko From Oz » 15 Sep 2020 23:41

Just adding my 2 cents worth, not that it means much, regarding your choice of the GTX 1660 SUPER as your GPU.

I recently purchased a Gigabyte GTX 1660 SUPER OC 6GB GDDR6 to replace the Gigabyte GTX 1050 OC 3GB GDDR5 I had installed in my i7-4790, Win10 Pro 64 system (16GB RAM).

I can highly recommend the 1660 SUPER as a 'budget' entry level card. It will easily handle ATS and ETS2 at 60fps (1920x1080 @ 60Hz screen) using the graphic settings found here; https://roextended.ro/forum/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=1000 , + having SSAO set to high.

With the above settings, the 1660 never dips below 60fps when using default SCS rigs, Overfloater's K100E or XBS' Autocar and Freightliner. I can now also use RTA Mods graphic hungry K200 with only minor dips into the ~50fps region (mainly up around the heavy forest areas in Oregon/Washington) and so far have not had any dips in fps in ETS2 with ANY rig.

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GT182
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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#89 Post by GT182 » 16 Sep 2020 00:04

Check this link out..... https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/gaming- ... e-desktops

And AMD's new "Big Navi" Radeon RX 6000 graphics card..... https://www.tomshardware.com/news/big-n ... eon-rx6000

Now I wish I'd waited and bought this. This is one cool Alienware gaming desktop from Dell. The graphics cards alone will blow your mind.
Gary - CB code name: CW
I've hauled ass down the road to deliver new cars and trucks, fuel, freight, and produce. Now I'm ATS addicted to doing the same thing in a simulation. :roll:

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Reignman
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Re: Potential New PC Build, Thoughts?

#90 Post by Reignman » 16 Sep 2020 00:21

Some newbie driver wrote:
15 Sep 2020 22:12
And about the Win 10 installation, beware! Because by your words I think you DON'T understand how the Win7 to Win10 change works. Microsoft never allowed (as far as I know) to use Windows 7 to activate Windows 10. What they alow is to UPGRADE a computer that has a legit and activated Windows 7 already on it. Doing so, the Microsoft licensing servers issue a new license for Windows 10 in behalf of the license of Windows 7 and TIED TO THAT HARDWARE.
I researched it awhile ago, and then again just now to be sure, but I think I'm safe. Maybe lol. I have a retail copy of Windows 7 Ultimate and it's been on 3 or 4 different PC's, and sometimes at the same time (because I owned 2 PC's at the same time), without any issues. Like you mentioned, every time I went to activate it, the auto activation would fail and I'd have to activate it over the phone. I would just tell them I got a new PC. So why do their servers appear to allow more than 1 PC to use the same license with Windows 7 when you activate it over the phone? Did they change that now with Windows 10? I guess I better do some more research. If it works to install Windows 7 first, and then upgrade, I'll do that.

Also awhile ago you said you wouldn't buy an RTX 2060. What would you get instead? Because my options are kind of limited. I don't think a 1660 Super or a 1660 ti is good enough for 1080p on a 144Hz monitor, and there's no GPU between that and the RTX 2060. The 2070 or even the 2060 Super are a bit too expensive. I won't buy a RTX 2060 at the current price of $320-340, and I'm going to wait to see what happens to prices after the 30 series is fully on the market, but other than the price, what's wrong with a RTX 2060? I know the ray tracing is bad, but I don't intend to use that feature. There are only a few games that support ray tracing anyway, but it still seems like the best budget option for 1080p or even 1440p. If I can get one for $280, that seems like a bargain, or whatever they drop to after the 30 series and gen 4 hit the shelves.

Plus now that I'm waiting, I'm even going to keep an eye on the R7 3700X. If that drops below $250 it might be too tempting to pass up. But yeah I'll have to see how everything shakes out by October. If RAM, SSD, CPU, and GPU prices drop like expected, I'd be willing to make some upgrades.

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